How To Organise Studying And Working With The Pomodoro Technique

The Pomodoro technique is a widely used time management method
that will help you get on top of your work and study. Follow this simple guide
to get started.

Do you find yourself lacking motivation to start the tasks on your
to-do list? Perhaps you take on other tasks or find distractions that keep you
away from that thing you don’t really want to do? This time management
technique will help you tackle your to-do list and encourage you to complete
your tasks in a more efficient way for your brain.

 

What Is The Pomodoro
Technique?

Francesco Cirillo created the Pomodoro technique in the 1980’s.
Like many university students, he was feeling overwhelmed with his studies and
the amount of tasks he had to complete. Therefore, he challenged himself to do
a short, timed amount of work and found that it encouraged him to keep working.
He has since perfected his technique with the most effective timed intervals
for our brains to work with https://www.tosw.org.

 

You may have noticed this technique is named after the tomato
(Pomodoro is Italian for tomato). Each Pomodoro – interval of time – is named
after the tomato shaped timer that Cirillo used to track his work!

 

How To Use The
Pomodoro Technique

This time management method requires you to use a timer to break
your work into intervals. Follow these simple steps to start using the Pomodoro
technique:

 

Choose which tasks you want to work on and how long you want to
work on them for

Set a timer for 25 minutes and put all your focus and effort into
the task

After the timer has finished, take a 5 minute break to renew your
concentration and energy

Repeat steps 1 and 2, but after 4 Pomodoro’s (timed intervals of
work) take a larger break of 20 minutes to refresh your brain.

Our brains have a limited attention span so the suggested 25
minutes of focused work is the perfect amount of time to be productive and stop
procrastinating.

 

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Still Struggling To
Get Started On A Task? Use These Helpful Tips!

 

• Start with small commitments – this is only a guide so feel free
to use what timings work for you! If you are finding it difficult to start a
task, set yourself a smaller Pomodoro e.g. 5 minutes. This would be a less
daunting way to get started and as you get into the task, you will find it
easier to carry on

 

• Avoid checking the timer – it will only seem longer if you watch
the seconds tick away… keep your mind on the task and you will find your focus

 

• Take your breaks away from your workspace – get up, stretch your
muscles, maybe start some chores you have to keep those cogs turning in a small
way

 

• Limit distractions by working in a neutral space – this means
without electronics like your phone or TV, and try not to work in your bed
(it’s comfy but you will most likely want to sleep)

 

• Put your phone on do not disturb (if you are using a timer on
your phone, be careful that it will not stop the timer from alerting you)

 

• Put smaller tasks together in a Pomodoro and consider starting
these first – completing smaller, less scary tasks first will ease you into a
focused attitude and will help you build momentum

 

• If you still can’t bring yourself to start a task because you
don’t know where to start, break it down into smaller, more manageable pieces.

 

Remember: this is just a template. Don’t force yourself to stick
to the 25 minute suggested schedule if it isn’t helping you. You can modify the
Pomodoro’s to work for you.

 

If you feel you could keep working without the need of that 5
minute break, then continue to work through your tasks, but remember you will
need to take a break sometime so you don’t exhaust your brain.

 

You may not find this technique works straight away. Everybody
works differently so stick with it and experiment with Pomodoro timings to find
the perfect one for YOU.



















































































 

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